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ravenousveggie

Thoughts on veggie food, work, play and life in general

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Salad

Food on the move

You have been working hard all morning.  Flitting between meetings, telephone calls and getting to through the to do list.  You then realise that you are hungry and forgot to pick your lunch up. Or your day has changed and you no longer have that lunch time meeting that was in the diary.

 

What to have for lunch?  You don’t have time to get to your favourite cafe or sandwich bar.The only other alternative is the sandwich van that comes round, or the local supermarket.

 

For me this fills me with dread.  The lack of variety for food on the go for vegetarians is depressing.  The usual offering of egg mayonnaise or cheese sandwiches – stored to such a cold temperature that they don’t taste of anything. Then you spot it.  A lovely looking salad – tomato, rocket, pasta – yum! Then your heart drops as you see it has chicken with it. Bowls of lovely looking noodles and pasta but all with added chicken, feta or tuna.

 

I love noodles and pasta.  The only vegetarian pasta offering is cheese and tomato sauce, or the joy of more feta.

 

It goes back to my previous blog talking about how difficult it is to get a vegetarian salad.

Food on the move
Photo by Alice Pasqual on Unsplash

This got me wondering how difficult it would be for the companies to produce a pick and mix salad selection?

 You choose your bowl of basic salad, then add your carbohydrate – pasta, noodles, potato, couscous – and then your protein option – nuts, breads, fish, meat.

 

Ok this will be a nightmare on the packaging front, but from a hunger satisfaction perspective this would be great. If you go into a service station or supermarket late at night you will see all these bowls of food sitting there.  By splitting out the ingredients you could make them more attractive to the person who just wants a quick ready made salad to go with their planned evening meal.

 

Its just a thought to make food on the go just a bit more inspiring.

 

Salad – Veggie Heaven, Right?

Salad is defined as ‘a cold dish of various mixtures of raw or cooked vegetables, usually seasoned with oil, vinegar or other dressing and sometimes accompanied by meat fish or other ingredients.

As a vegetarian eating out ‘sometimes accompanied’ needs to be changed to ‘uusally accompanied by meat or fish’. A large number of establishments do not offer a vegetarian salad. Now is it just me or does this sound a bit bizarre? A traditionally vegetable based dish that vegetarians can’t eat.

My theory is thqt it is the fear of producing a dish without an obvvious protein element – prefectly acceptable for a side saladh, but not for a main.
Of course the easiest default here is cheese, but even that doesn’t happen that often (sigh of relief) Why is it that other ingredients are overlooked? Mixed beans, nuts (ooh pine nuts), quinoa, egg- all these seem to be overlooked.
I’m not the best cook in the world but I don’t understand why creating a salad around non meant or fish ingredients is so difficult.

The most annoying part is asking for a meat free version and being told it can’t be done. A restaurant I visited recenlty told me I couldn’t have the avocado and bacon salad without the bacon as it was pre mixed. This being the case Im not sure how they cannback up their boast of everything being freshly made, and thus may take longer to serve. What a waste of avocado. By pre-mixing they have just made their menu less flexible and reduced the choice available, with little extra effort.

Some of the bigger chains do offer some gorgeous vege friendly salads and are, in my experience, more able to be flexible and take out elements you may not want to eat. It is ususally the independent restaurants and pubs – the ones we need to be supporting – that seem to be missing a trick here.

So next time you are eating out, check out the salad section. How many immediatley vegetarian freindly options are there? And does the menu indicate that you are welcome to ask for changes.

 

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